Mandan News

Diane Boit: 4-H Judging Team ranks third in nation, 1962

 

25 Years Ago – 1987

The Mandan Athletic and Recreation Club has selected as their Athletes of the Month for November: Roy Ogden in Boys’ Wrestling; Stephanie Dietrich in Girls’ Basketball; and Barb Stork in Girls’ Swimming.

Roy remained undefeated during the Lions Wrestling tournament and was a champion in his weight class. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Ogden. Voted the Most Valuable Player by her teammates, Stephanie averaged 22 points and 11 rebounds per game during the State Tournament and was named to the All State Tournament Team. She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Dietrich. Barb Stork was also voted Most Valuable Player by her swimming teammates, as well as the Most Competitive and Most Spirited member for the 1987 team. She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Stork.

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Dr. James Clement, Mandan Veterinary Clinic, has been elected president of the North Dakota Veterinary Medical Association during the group’s annual meeting.

Jolene Bates, Morton County home economist, has received the State Achievement In-Service Award at the recent meeting of the National Association of Extension Agents held in San Diego, Calif.

 

50 Years Ago – 1962

The Morton County 4-H Livestock Judging team has placed third in the nation against representatives from every state in the union during competition at the National 4-H Club Livestock Exposition held in Chicago. Members of the Morton County team are: Arnold, Robert and Loraine Meyer and Lloyd Rossow, all of Flasher and all from the Pleasant Valley 4-H Club. Eighteen-year-old Arnold Meyer also scored the highest among 113 individuals in judging sheep for which he received a 19-jewel Elgin wristwatch. Accompanying the team to the nationals was their coach, James Stine, county agent.

Seventeen candidates tried out for cheerleaders at Mandan High School, with the following being selected by the student body: Sandy Syvrud and Louie Zachmeier, seniors; Rodine Marshall, junior; Linda Syvrud and Mary Kay Leslie, sophomores. Louie is the school’s first male cheerleader.

George Barth, rural mail carrier at Solen, has retired from the U.S. Postal Service after 38 years of service, all in the Solen area. Barth began his postal career in 1924, following service in World War I. According to Barth, during the severest of winter weather in the 1930s, he often delivered the mail on a 56-mile route over ungraded snow-covered roads on horseback or with a team and sleigh at a salary then of only $4 a day.

The 1962 cheerleaders (l-r) Rodine Marshall, Sandy Syvrud, Louie Zachmeier (at the top), Linda Syvrud and Mary Kay Leslie. Submitted photo

75 Years Ago – 1937

Census cards returned to the local post office during the national unemployment census indicate that there are nearly 900 unemployed people in Mandan. The number represents all patrons of the Mandan post office, including those served by city, rural and star routes. According to officials, the number of unemployed in Mandan is boosted by the large influx of farm residents in the past year. More than 3,000 official-looking 4×9 folders had been distributed to every home in the city and rural territory served by the office.

Mrs. Myrtle Chase entertained 10 guests at a bridal shower honoring Miss Ethel Chase, bride-elect The evening was spent in playing Monopoly. Miss Chase was presented with a shower of pottery.

Lloyd Lohstreter, regular left tackle on the Mandan High School football team this year, has been elected captain of the Braves for the 1938 season by his teammates. Lohstreter is a junior and is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Lohstreter.

The traditional bell-ringer on the 1937 Christmas Seal proclaims appreciation for past accomplishments for the cure of tuberculosis. However, Mandan’s bell-ringers are the local Boy and Girls Scouts who are working with the American Legion Auxiliary in staging the annual Christmas Seal campaign. In a seemingly endless procession, the Boy and Girl Scouts are walking up and down Mandan streets delivering packets containing 100 seals to every home in the city. Householders are asked to replace each stamp taken from the packet with a penny. After one week’s time, the sealed packet, with its jingling pennies, will be collected by the Scouts on their second bell-ringing expedition.

 

100 Years Ago – 1912

“Joe Zachmeier and O.P. Lilly of the government station at Rock Haven have claimed the distinction of being the first to drive on the ice across the Missouri River this winter. Although Saturday there was a wide stretch of open water in the center of the channel, they braved the dangers and drove over to Bismarck on Wednesday.

“This is the third year that these two have been the first to cross the river on the ice. They also claim to have been the last to cross before the river broke up last spring.”

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“What promises to be one of the leading social events of the season is the dancing party to be held at the Mandan theatre this evening for the benefit of the public library. Dancing will start at 8:30 o’clock and will continue until 12:30. Music will be furnished by the popular five-piece Comus club orchestra.

“One of the features planned by the ladies is the buffet luncheon to be served at 10:30 o’clock. A table will be placed on the stage, and the gentlemen will become waiters and serve themselves and their lady friends. The price of admission has been fixed at $1.50 per couple and twenty-five cents for extra ladies.”

 

125 Years Ago – 1887

The village of Mandan was organized in the spring of 1881; by 1887 the population was already nearing the 2,500 mark.

December 14, 1887: “On Friday, at 3:30 p.m. the thermometer stood at 29 degrees above zero.

“The Sioux teamsters were hard at work yesterday loading up their teams with freight for a trip to the Standing Rock Agency.

“It may be that the advent of a new ‘fast’ train on the Northern Pacific will be the dawning of better times for the country.

“Train No. 1 came in this morning on the new schedule, on time, arriving at Mandan at 7:30. It stopped in Mandan only ten minutes, and was then off in a hurry toward the western horizon.

“Before the advent of the fast trains, it was not customary to have buckets of coal strung along the platform waiting for the train, as is now the fashion. Now the work of coaling and watering the train is reduced to a science in Mandan.”

 

(To contact Diane Boit, email mandan-news.com.)