Mandan News

Driving antiques along a byway

Beginning the more than a hundred mile journey at the Riverwood RV building in Mandan, the drivers made a last check to make sure everything was in working order for the voyage. Along with the antique vehicles, a number of chase vehicles followed, hauling trailers with supplies in case any of the vehicles ran into trouble. (Dustin White photo)

Beginning the more than a hundred mile journey at the Riverwood RV building in Mandan, the drivers made a last check to make sure everything was in working order for the voyage. Along with the antique vehicles, a number of chase vehicles followed, hauling trailers with supplies in case any of the vehicles ran into trouble. (Dustin White photo)


By Dustin White
Mandan News, editor

Emerging from the distant past, dozens of antique cars made a trip they hadn’t for decades. Beginning in Mandan, the Pioneer Auto Club set off on a 137 mile trip, which would commemorate the first annual Motor to Medora event.

The Pioneer Auto Club gathered on Friday, June 20, at Riverwood RV in Mandan, for what would be an all day trip. Testing both driver, as well as machine, the group headed out on the Old Red Ten.

Facing a possibility of rain, or even a storm, the drivers headed out with the assurance that if problems did occur, chase vehicles with trailers and supplies were following close behind. Nearly as soon as they progressed along Main Street Mandan though, the clouds began to dissipate, and it became a beautiful drive along the scenic byway.

The first lag of the trip, from Mandan to New Salem, allowed the drivers to test out their vehicles. Seeing that some of the antiques had not made long journeys for decades, there was a real possibility that they would not be able to make the entire trip.

To begin, the going was slow. While the average speed was meant to stay around 30 mph, as to not overly stress the vehicles, a few of the cars slugged behind. Even though the drivers had spent weeks making sure their vehicles were in fine condition, a couple still had to drop out and be trailered rest of the way. In the end, the hills that help Old Red Ten stand out as a scenic byway, were just a bit too much for some of the antique cars.

For most of the drivers though, the journey went off without a hitch. After leaving New Salem, the vehicles took to the Interstate, along with a Highway Patrol escort, in order to avoid the unpaved section of Old Red Ten

It wasn’t long though until the drivers were able to get back on to the scenic byway, and make another stop in Glen Ullin. It wasn’t just driving the these vehicles were doing during that time though. Being multitaskers, many of the drivers also were busy cooking their lunch. Yet, they did so in a way that was unique.

Using specially designed cookers, that sat on their cars manifold, the drivers were able to cook up a number of different dishes.

Leaving Glen Ullin, the drivers would past through, and rest, in Richardton, Dickinson, Belfied and Medora, their final destination.

Around nine hours later, the journey was finished. There were a couple fewer vehicles driving along with the group, but the end goal was completed. The drivers had arrived in Medora for the Medora Car Show.

Conquering the first hill along the route, these three vehicles began a trip like they haven’t for many years. (Dustin White photo)

Conquering the first hill along the route, these three vehicles began a trip like they haven’t for many years. (Dustin White photo)